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Monthly Archives: July 2018

Key to Getting the Job

1. Make your goals clear. If you’re content in your current position and don’t want further responsibility, it’s all right to say so. On the other hand, if you want something more, make sure that your employer knows it! There’s no need to be rude; simply putting the information out there is more than enough. For example, you might say, “I would eventually like to be a construction foreman, and I’d like the opportunity to develop leadership skills within my current position.” If your current employer doesn’t know that you want to move up, you may miss out on valuable opportunities. When you’re looking to move to a new company, share why you’re interested in them: “I love your company’s vision, and all of my interactions with the company have shown that your culture would be a great fit for me.” Your employer can’t read your mind. By clearly sharing exactly what is that you want, you’ll discover that they’re more likely to give it to you.

2. Follow the application process. Whether you’re hoping to move up from within or you’re looking for a new job, it’s important to follow the described application process to the letter. Take a good look at even the most unusual or obscure instructions in the application process. Hiring managers at a new company take note of the details: if they tell you to send your information by email, do so. If they ask for a hard copy of your resume, it’s important to provide it. When you pay attention to the details of the application, you show that you’re genuinely interested in a specific job, not just following the same procedure for every application you put in–and you prove that you’ll give that same attention to detail in your everyday job performance.

3. Practice what you want to say. When you approach your boss about your interest in a new position or promotion, practice it first! Take the time to think through exactly what you want to say and remove filler from the statement. You’ll find that this makes you appear more confident, which in turn increases your employer’s confidence in you.

Career Planning in the Hospitality Industry

Job Prospects

Many avenues are open to a hotel management graduate. Not only in the hotels but various other fields like;

• Airline

• Cruise line

• Travel and Tour

• Restaurants

• Bars

• Fast food chains

• Catering industry (Institution, Railway and hospitals)

• Highway Motels

• Amusement Parks and Malls

• Multiplexes

• Hotel & Tourism Institutes

• Self employment, are to name a few.

High turnover is a key challenge in the hospitality industry. Employers have difficulty finding workers who possess basic “soft skills,” which are often a prerequisite for success in a customer service-oriented field. English proficiency is a key challenge because a large percentage of the hospitality workforce does not speak English as their primary language.

With the hospitality industry’s growth rate increasing, the importance of finding good employees, especially young workers, is a high priority. Historically, the hospitality industry has drawn heavily from the young labor pool to meet their workforce needs, but in recent years the industry has been left with an insufficient pipeline of new skilled workers to satisfy the demand.

Successful Career Planning in Hospitality

Successful career planning is very tempting for everyone. Planning of a good career involves many decisions. What will help you to make a good decision? A good decision making model. All you need to have a good vision statement which will help you to find what is it you want to do and for whom. Once you identify this it is easier to make out your right decision.

Most of us are not well trained in decision making. Most of our decisions are made by our parents or relatives or friends. And we follow them, because we are influenced by these outside factors to believe strongly that “experience is the best teacher.” Many a time experience is quite expensive. Developing a good decision making module and using a good process will lead you to achieve your desired goal.

A good career planning process will have the following steps:

• Decision Making

• Know yourself

• Narrow your options

• Chose the right job

• Execute

Decision Making: A good decision making is an essential skill for career success. If you can learn to make timely and well-considered decisions, then it can lead you to spectacular and well-deserved success. All of us have to make decisions every day. Some decisions are relatively straightforward and simple while others are quite complex. Simple decision needs a simple decision making process. But difficult or complex decisions usually involve issues like uncertainty, complexity, high – risk, alternatives, and interpersonal issues. With these difficulties in mind, the best way is to use an effective process. Clear processes usually lead to consistent, high-quality results, and they can improve the quality of almost everything we do.

Every hospitality student’s career dream is to become a Hotel General Manager. Becoming a Hotel General Manager may be an objective for your career, but first you have to understand ‘what is it you want to do and for whom.’ Ideally, career planning is more than just finding a job. A process shows you what you want to do for the rest of your life. You need to find out what is right for you without being influenced by others. Because some people still have negative image of hospitality industry, and may discourage you.

Know yourself: You need to know yourself before you search for a job. Understanding yourself will help you to find out the best job for your abilities. Knowing yourself in essence, you understand your strengths, weaknesses, interests, values, and personality. Knowing yourself includes classifying your skills, interests, values, personality type, and developing a vision statement.

Know your skills: Start creating a list of your achievements and accomplishments. Do not restrict only with your professional or technical knowledge. Be extensive and cover everything from your school days accomplishments, hobbies, extracurricular activities, problem-solving abilities, project management etc. This list will be an excellent start and help you creating your resume. The root causes of these accomplishments are your strengths.

Interests: Identify your interests in relation to the opportunities and demands of the hospitality industry. It is essential to identify interests that have connection with the hospitality industry such as traveling, cooking, meeting people, organizing events, participation in team activities, and learning languages. Sincere interest and genuine enthusiasm are keen factors for successful career.

Values: Values are the rules by which we make decisions about right and wrong, should and shouldn’t, good and bad. They also tell us which are more or less important, and which is useful. You should examine your values during the self assessment process. Trying to answer the question “what matters most to me?” working in a large group or a small group, high risk or security, working individually or working with a team, multicultural or homogeneous environment, long work hours with few holidays or eight hours of work with weekends and holidays, can be very thought provoking.

Personality type: Knowing what type of personality you are and what are your psychological preferences and finding a career which suits you will make you more successful and you will gain more satisfaction from the career. There are many tools available on the web to find what type of personality you are.

Handle a Behavioral Interview

Behavioral interview questions are usually designed to match the competencies needed for success in a role (e.g., problem-solving skills, project management skills, relationship building skills, etc.). For instance, if a job requires a person to think strategically, an interviewer might ask them to describe a recent time when they had to define a business strategy.

With that in mind, it’s useful to identify what competencies a job requires so you can prepare accordingly for related interview questions:

• Sometimes formal job descriptions will list the competencies required for a position. If not, Human Resources or the hiring manager for the role will likely share the competencies if asked. It’s certainly OK to ask about the competencies required for success in a role when applying for a position.

• You may also be able to discern the required competencies by closely reviewing the job description and “reading between the lines”, so to speak. In my experience, most job competencies fall into the three broad categories: Thinking (e.g., problem-solving, innovating, etc.), Results (e.g., accountability, time management, etc.), and People (e.g., networking, influencing, etc.). Those categories can be used as a guide for deciphering the competencies underpinning a job description. For example, while reading the job description, you could ask yourself, “What thinking-related competencies seem needed for this role?”, “What results-related competencies seem needed for this role?”, and so on.

Once you’ve identified the competencies required for a job, the next step is to recall instances from your work experience when you evidenced those competencies:

• Recall examples that occurred within the last year or less (the more recent, the better). They’ll be easier to remember and share details about. Further, behavioral interviewers usually require examples to be relatively recent.

• Avoid getting caught-up in trying to identify the biggest, best, or most elaborate example you can think of. I’ve interviewed many people who had difficulty giving examples because they didn’t feel the example was sophisticated or spectacular enough to share. Behavioral interviewers tend to focus more on the how than the what in the examples you provide. For instance, you probably take a similar approach to delegating work whether a project is large or small, but it’d be easier to convey the details of the smaller project when the interviewer asks.

• Don’t let an undesired outcome keep you from sharing what would otherwise be a good example. I see this often, for example, when asking people to describe a time when they had to influence upward (e.g., gain buy-in from senior leadership, change their boss’s opinion, etc.). They hesitate to share an example because they were unsuccessful at influencing upward. However, once they share the example it’s clear (to me as a behavioral interviewer) that their approach to influencing was sound, despite senior leadership choosing not to buy-in.

About Escape The City Jobs

I searched for an answer in the form of an online income stream. If I could make regular money from the internet it would balance out the short falls and quiet times of my other work. Little would I know that it would lead to something even better – a reliable income from the internet.

That was the dream – constant income flowing on tap from automated sources. Unfortunately it took much longer than I expected and I lost a lot of living in the process. I lost some dear friends in the process too. I leaned too heavily on this ‘magic bullet’ of the internet and got burned.

Not that it’s all bad of course. I learned a lot about myself in the process and that’s a good thing. I stuck with it and never gave up – that’s enabled me to continue to learn and earn from the internet.

What Have I learned?

Initially I began with eBay the auction site and I bought and sold items. My room was full of second-hand stuff I had bought from the charity shops and I didn’t shift a lot of it. I was spending a lot of time travelling to and from the post office and standing in queues with my items which needed weighing.

I decided I wasn’t going to get rich by doing this. I was tired and it seemed a lot more hassle than a normal job would have been. I looked into ways of automating product delivery. One way was bulk buying and selling through a single listing on eBay. However this required capital – something which I didn’t have.

I kept buying courses which promised to show me a new and ‘quicker’ way to make money on eBay and the internet! Some of them actually worked but mostly they needed a lot of time and effort. Selling the information was a much better bet until eBay changed their rules about selling digital products.

You used to be able to sell a product on eBay and once you had received payment you could (automatically) send your customer to an automated website where they could download the product. That sounded amazing to me! It meant you didn’t even have to be there in order to take a payment and make a delivery.

Unfortunately eBay changed their rules so you would have to send a physical product rather than simply direct someone to an automatically downloaded product. I started down this line but then discovered affiliate marketing which was basically the same automated process – allowing you to sell digital products online and send customers to a website to enroll in a membership.

Membership products which meant an automated delivery were great products to sell on the internet. When I got my first taste of this working I was very excited! I sent people to a sales page which then converted into a sale. They got instant access to a membership program and I could automate the entire process.

I checked my email the following day after setting up one of these systems and found several sales. It was an amazing moment. Sadly it didn’t last and my AdWords account was shut down. I was devastated and it wasn’t until a long time later, and with another course, that I repeated this success.